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Icon Information on BRG20 - (Fire Department)


Series Information
BALTIMORE CITY
BALTIMORE CITY ARCHIVES
(Fire Department)
1862-1986
BRG20

Series Description

Efforts to prevent and combat fires date back to the earliest days of Baltimore. The first attempt to provide fire protection came in 1747 through the colonial legislature in a law specifying fines for unsafe chimneys and houses not having ladders that reached to the tops of their roofs. The origins of an organized fire department developed with the creation of the earliest volunteer fire companies - the Mechanical (1763), Union (1782), Friendship (1785), and Deptford (1792). For more info in the history of the Mechanical company, see Ed Papenfuse's blog post: Baltimore's First Responders

Until the middle of the nineteenth century volunteer fire companies provided the chief form of fire protection. Supporting these companies were occasional state and city laws, such as a 1787 act in the Maryland Legislature requiring every householder to maintain two leather buckets near the front entrance and authorizing the Baltimore Town Commissioners to dig wells and erect pumps and a 1799 municipal ordinance prohibiting the erection of frame dwellings, and occasional municipal appropriations to the companies for equipment and supplies. By 1834 there were fifteen volunteer companies and by 1858 twenty-two.

Although these volunteer companies were the only method of fire protection, they hardly constituted a very effective system. These companies were as much political and social organizations and often engaged in fights with rival companies and, on several occasions, were the ringleaders of municipal riots. Moreover, few of the companies were adequately equipped or trained. In 1834 representatives of each of the companies formed the Baltimore United Fire Department to regulate fire protection but most of the major problems persisted. In 1858 the municipal government established a professional fire department which has remained in existence to the present, governed by a board of commissioners.

More detailed information about the history of this municipal agency can be gleaned from Clarence H. Forrest, Official History of the Fire Department of the City of Baltimore Together With Biographies and Portraits of Eminent Citizens of Baltimore (Baltimore: Williams and Wilkens Press, 1898) ; J. Albert Cassedy, The Firemen's Record (Baltimore: Published by the author, 1911) ; William A. Murray, The Rigs of the Unheralded Heroes: One Hundred Years of Baltimore's Fire Engines. 1872-1971 (N.p. Published by the authors, 1971); George W. McCreary, The Ancient and Honorable Mechanical Company of Baltimore (Baltimore: Kohn and Pollock, 1901); Charles L. Wagandt, "Fighting Fires the Baltimore Way - A British View of 1862," Maryland Historical Magazine 61 (September 1966): 257-61; and Ray Hamilton, "The Baltimore Fire Department Pension System: A Legislative History," unpublished paper, 1979, Baltimore City Department of Legislative Reference. Note that the original manuscript report of British Consul Ferdinand Bernal to Lord John Russell in May of 1861, from Baltimore, is to be found on Editonline.us, an on-line editing service developed by Dr. Edward C. Papenfuse.

For Fire Department Roster Cards, see BRG7-12





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Found 6 total items for this series.

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DateSeries NameDescriptionLinksMSA Citation
Details1862-1967Service Records

Service records of a selection of firefighters including name, residence, date of birth; former occupation, date of appointment, branch of the service, position, promotions, assignments, sick leave, injuries, charges, commendations, date left service and cause, and occasionally date of death. A number of the service records also have photographs of the individual.

A separate name index to these records is available and should be used by the researcher. The use of these records is restricted those of the firefighters who are deceased and/or who entered service seventy-five years ago or before.

Restricted to microfilm only (BCA 189-191).

 BRG20-1
Details1938Fire Incendiary Bureau Preliminary and Suspicious Investigation Reports

Reports compiled for fires causing a fatality or injury that are of a suspicious or incendiary origin and on multiple alarms. Includes date, case number, name of owner and occupant, time of alarms, and statements from persons connected with the fire.

Available on microfilm at the Fire Department. The agency also maintains owner, occupant, and investigative information indexes.

 BRG20-2
Details1874-1878Insurance ReportsRecords of the Maryland Beneficial Association, ah insurance company contracted by the municipal government in 1875 (see Ord. 140) to provide insurance for the firefighters. Includes minutes of its directors regarding the organization of the company in 1874, its by-laws, correspondence about the contract with the city, a copy of the policy agreement with the Fire Department, financial records, and notes on the leaves and injuries of individual firefighters. BRG20-3
Details1972-1986Board of Fire Commissioners Meeting MinutesMeeting minutes of the-Board of Fire Commissioners, the policy-making body of the Baltimore City Fire Department. The minutes include budget matters; the promotion, demotion, and commendation of firefighters; rules and regulations; disciplinary hearings; actions of the board; and internal investigations. BRG20-4
Details1910-1980Assignment CardsAssignment cards held by the Office of the Chief of the Department meant to give information about active duty personnel. BRG20-5
  Details1994-2001 Reports of firest Investigated by the Office of the Fire Marshall BRG20-6
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